About your Search

20121118
20121118
STATION
CNN 12
CNNW 12
SFGTV2 10
CSPAN2 6
CSPAN 5
FBC 5
MSNBCW 5
SFGTV 5
KNTV (NBC) 4
MSNBC 4
KPIX (CBS) 3
WBAL (NBC) 3
WJLA (ABC) 3
WUSA (CBS) 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 105
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 105 (some duplicates have been removed)
drive capability, technology, and ast technology and marvell is leading the pack. we continue to drive this. >> i will jump in for a second. solid state drives, drives that don't have a platter, i never want anything to go out the door that somebody says what? continue. sorry. >> it sounds like your strategy now from what you said about digital lifestyle, you have tvs, in-home technologies. are you trying to diversify now because some of these older technologies or other technologies are falling off? >> we actually, as a company, i believe, we're the only semiconductor today, we're the top five semiconductor, one of the youngest leader in the semiconductor industry. but in terms of technology, we have the most diversified and the most broad coverage of the industry because of that. therefore, today, we can address and we are prepared to address the new era of digital life better than any company, i believe. >> you're betting because so many things will have chips in them. dishwashers already have chips in them. who would have imagined that? coffee makers, television sets, all kinds of
a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show u
and how do you use technology, how do you use your people best, it's a full-time job, and it spans the gambit. we have initiatives from fuel efficiency, travel, how you do your people processes differently, and we in the dc mode team spent a lot of time thinking about the business i.t. that under lays all that is correct and how could you -- all that, and how could you come up with better outcomes. >> let's go to, what would you say is sort of one of the most concrete things that has had the most cross-cutting impact that you guys have instituted that's really going to make major change? >> you know, one of the things we're excited about is we've created a strategic management plan for the department of defense, so for the first time in its history, in the business side, we have strong articulated goals that are about outcomes you want to achieve. articulated by the business leader. well understood and articulationed and able to be acted on. the strategic management planning covers all the major areas of business, if you will. financial management, people, energy, how you buy thing
discovered some serious flaws in that technology. if the problems are not fixed it could create security and concern at airports around the country. >> you are watching, real-time video of an airplane final approach at san francisco international airport. the coordinates are real. the landing pattern real. as are all the airplanes, flying alongside in front of or behind the plane you are watching. the only trouble, the plane you are watching land is not real. it is a ghost airplane. inserted into a real-time actual air traffic pattern, by computer hackers. >> you see all of it including the ones flying around. >> nick foster, created the demonstration of what a computer hacker look himself could do to disrupt air traffic at may jr. airports around the country. >> we can prove without actually inject things into the air traffic control system t it is pis -- traffic control system. >> the new system called next gen is to become fully operational by 2020. a complex system, of air traffic control that will use satellite based technology similar to the gps you use in your car. rather than the
are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with o
advanced technology to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. [ male announcer ] jill and her mouth have lived a great life. but she has some dental issues she's not happy about. so i introduced jill to crest pro-health for life. selected for people over 50. pro-health for life is a toothpaste that defends against tender, inflamed gums, sensitivity and weak enamel. conditions people over 50 experience. crest pro-health for life. so jill can keep living the good life. crest. life opens up when you do. so i brought it to mike at meineke. we gave her car a free road handling chec
to be safe. thousands of jobs. use the most advanced technology to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. >>> now for our "what in the world" segment. if history is any guide, second terms are often disrupted by a foreign policy crisis. it's easy to see how that might happen over the next four years with iran or syria, but there's a distinct possibility that the next big foreign policy crisis will take place somewhere else. perhaps thousands of miles away in asian waters over five islands and three barren rocks, all uninhabited except for a few goats. for months now, chinese and
in second place to those countries in the new technology industries of the future and i think that plays an important role. you know the obama vision was one where they thought better suited the country. and there is no question on social issues. whether it is women's health care, immigration, gay rights. there are a set of issues particularly for younger voters so, people vote very, very carefully. the economy was a dominant issue. i think that is why ultimately some people chose the president to continue the journey we are on. now quickly in terms of democracy, you know we don't know this for sure, but we could be seeing very different elections. that of that in 2010, 14, maybe 18 will be quite a bit different. the comments i made two years ago were predicated on what we thought would happen in a presidential year. the latino turnout was surging. president winning more of the latino votes but even winning the cuban votes. you saw young votes exceeding the turnout from four years ago surprising most analysts. you saw african american turnout. you saw the excitement of the first african
connelly. part of our mission is to make sure that as new technology comes along that people don't have to choose between using the new technology and keeping their privacy. we are pleased to hear that mtc is taking action that clipper action, although not as precise as information from a cell phone, can reveal a lot about a individual. it can reveal if you got on or off bart near a hospital, near a clinic, all sorts of things that may imply things about your personal life and particularly over a long period of time there is an extensive amount of information collected about a person. are they going to church on a regular basis. are they going to baseball games when they are supposed to be at work? i think it is important to recognize that these records should be respected, should be treated as private information and as the commission said, should be looked at and retained only as long as necessary for operational purposes, not because it's cheap to retain data but because you need them for fraud. i'd like to demonstrate to the committee, this is an application for an androi
in power, with sewer, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's wo renewable energy gener
by the technological improvements and a five or ten year technological lead than the countries we're competing with. it's interesting, paul, if you look the at the last three or four years, now what industry has created more than any other industry in the united states. >> paul: the electric car industry, steve? (laughter) >> no, not that one. oil and gas and the thing that's so amazing, the president is doing almost everything he can to try to hold this back with regulations and with not allowi allowing permitting most of the oil and gas development is going out on private land and where the president has to get with the program because we could literally create millions more jobs if we get this story right. >> paul: jim, the consequences here economically are big for downstream production, things like manufacturing. >> right. >> that had left the, i talked to one ceo, dow chemical, who had planned years ago never to build another plant in the united states and now making a 4 billion dollar bet on manufacturing and chemical production in the the united states. that's extraordinary. you're seeing that
. but israel has the edge in technology here. its sophisticated iron dome system takes out most rockets before they find a target. israel's military is also armed with precision-guided missiles. in this case, striking what is said to be the home of an hamas leader. egypt is trying to prevent this war from getting out of hand. spearheading talks aimed at ending the violence. israel's prime minister says hamas can end all this. ben wedeman is watching the conflict play out. >> reporter: we've seen apparent urgent action by the israeli army in this area to get as much material, tanks, armored personnel carriers and troops in the area around gaza in obvious preparation for a potential ground invasion of the gaza strip. but a decision to actually go in has to come from the leadership, from prime minister benjamin netanyahu and from his security cabinet. that has not come yet. on sunday, it's expected that the secretary general of arab league is going to come to gaza with four arab foreign ministers. it may be difficult to launch a ground invasion while just a high-level group is there. we understan
of this system, paid for partly with u.s. tax money, they will see amazingly effective antimissile technology at work. and that's said to be 90% successful. it discriminates between the missiles that are going to hit cities and the ones that are just going to land in the woods and takes out the ones that are headed for cities. so it's a potential game changer here. >> schieffer: all right, well, david you'll be back if our rowntable later in the broadcast. i want to turn now to john mccain, a member of the armed services committee, the ranking republican on armed services. senator, what can the united states do here? obviously, no bon wants this thing to spiral out of control. >> well, the united states, obviously, should be as heavily involved as they possibly can. i'm not sure how much influence that this administration has. the president's first priority in 2009 was the israeli-palestinnian peace process. obviously, there was no progress there, and there are various reasons for it. we won't waste the time. i think several things make this issue very dangerous. one is egypt and the whole ch
rocket aimed toward the city of ashdod. but israel has the edge in technology here. its sophisticated iron dome system takes out most rockets before they find a target. israel's military is also armed with precision-guided missiles. in this case, striking what is said to be the home of an hamas leader. egypt is trying to prevent this war from getting out of hand. spearheading talks aimed at ending the violence. israel's prime minister says hamas can end all this. bd ben wedeman is watching the conflict play out. >> reporter: we've seen apparent urgent action by the israeli army in this area to get as much material, tanks, armoured personnel carriers and troops in the area around gaza in obvious preparation for a potential ground invasion of the gaza strip. but a decision to actually go in has to come from the leadership, from prime minister benjamin netanyahu and from his security cabinet. that has not come yet. on sunday, it's expected that the secretary general of arab league is going to come to gaza with four arab foreign ministers. it may be difficult to launch a ground invasion w
and going after the militants. israel says it was tarring ago mastermind of rocket technology when it targeted the home of a militant. consequences of that according to the palestinians 11 civilians died including five women and four children. very difficult to ascertain precisely what is going down on the ground, but israel continuing to make plans for a possible ground incursion if diplomacy fails and the clock is ticking. >> gregg: david lee miller, thank you. >> heather: meantime, president obama reaffirming his commitment to israel saying that no country would tolerate missiles raining down from outside the borders. he made the comments during a news conference. listen. israel has every light to expect that it does not have missiles fired into its territory. if that can be accomplished without a ramping up of military activity in gaza, that is preferable. that is not just preferable for the people of gaza but it's also preferable for israelis because israeli troops are in gaza, they are much more at risk of incurring fatalities or being wounded. we're going to have to see what
spending and government but not for a while. >> that was designed to technology on willingness to make tough cuts. >> as the cliff was crafted to be so distasteful officials would do anything to avoid it. >> you don't think they will cut military former military are cut entitlements? >> they assume it is so bad they would not to accept it but they are not even talking about cuts. talking $1 trillion over 10 years but not real cuts but baseline budgeting teeseven explained that. i hate when you talk that way because nobody understands that. if i cut it means i spend less but it would you do it means? >> we have already written into the next budget the automatic increase. if it is a $10 billion increase and cut it down at 9 billion that they cut it down we just now increased 9 billion instead of 10 billion. it is done a purpose so people get confused. that is the reason nothing happens. they got away wih this horrible sides there was a lot of wealth of the country and they could get along. we will raise subsidies and one versus the other but now the treasury is there the country is bankr
initiative launched by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to
of influential technology ceos i spoke to jack dorsey about his rapidly growing company square. he's trying to put your money where your mobile is. >> when i was 8 i had a business card that said jack dorsey consulta consultant. >> he hopes his mobile payment startup square will change the relationship you have with your wallet. >> money, as a concept, as been with us for 5,000 years and started with us trading seashells and touches every person on the planet. at one point in every person's life some person feels bad about it. it feels like a burden. how do we remove the burden and make it feel like something that gets them to an experience they want to have or a service or product they want to buy? >> talk to us about square and what it is enabling. >> less people are carrying cash. they are not carrying checks anymore. they are carrying plastic cards everywhere. square was a device you plugged in to your device, iphone, android and it would accept cards and the money would go to the bank account the next day. >> it is a great idea. because of that you have other companies nipping at your
? it happened because of the force of power of the information technology boom, the creation of private credit, and rapid increase in tax revenues. stephanie showed us something that was not a forecast at the time. those who were there in 2000 remember that the secretary of the treasury at the time and the chairman of the federal reserve were talking about a 13-year horizon for the complete elimination of the public debt. there was no forecast that the technology boom would come to an end, but it did. from 2000 onward, we were back into a more normal position of the government running substantial deficits as the private sector rebuild its financial position. that is the first point. long-term forecasts, the idea that one can control the future position of the debt and deficit by actions taken today, is an extremely tenuous and debatable idea. the second point is that there are certain assumptions being made which create extremely scary scenarios. those numbers that were shown -- in stephanie's presentation, the expectation that public debt would rise close to 200% of gdp by 2005. what is that
conspired to reduce our privacy. first, there's technology. social media allowed us to share every detail of our lives intentionally and unintensely. the photo tagged on facebook, the wayward strike to reply to all button. you get the picture. we now leave a digital trail traced by anyone who buys access to it. this week, the obama campaign knew what tv shows the targeted voters watched. there's the massive explosion of the surveillance in the wake of 9/11. thanks to the petri at act and continued under the obama administration. the government has more access to info about us than at anytime in history. a small example of what this looks like. check out this graph of u.s. government from google. these are requests that don't require warrants and this doesn't include the security related requests not disclosed. for awhile, i thought the combination of these trends, the u bik wiity of technology was pushing us to a future where citizens would be unable to keep their secrets while the government keeps its secrets. i feared it would end up totally exposed to each other and the state. the stat
industry. coming up, we get plugged into the latest auto trends and ehow technology way beyond gps is helping us. >> how about love at first sniff? a look at the latest dating craze. and black friday sales are starting earlier than ever and store >> ama: opposition is growing to stores like wal-mart, toys 'r' us, target that plan to kick off blackty deals on thursday night. an employee started an online petition to give back the holiday to employees and their families. there are more than 238,000 signatures but experts say when it comes to competition, stores like target are simply supplying a demand. >> an appetite for shopping and it's becoming earlier and earlier. nobody wants to come in second in that race. so it's really a question, look it, people are thinking about shopping, they want to go shopping. >> ama: opening up at 9:00 thanksgiving night, provides an after dinner shopping event for the family. many employees argue it takes those values away. >> when you go to buy a car, fuel economy is major deciding factor for 97% of customers, according to a study by ford motor com
it for the wired generation. the digital generation. it used technology in the state to steer children back into the telos o you have-tell us hou have assigned this application? >> these mobile devices are so engaging. this is a great way to tell a story so in our ap this is all about books will launched thousands of titles. and videos! with videos levar burton so the there are islands in the sky, you are in the cockpit of a hot air balloon. >> that is so cool. chain if and austin. >> is it multi-lingual? >> it will be, assuming it is like a subscription model for a library card it is like searchable. they can down load that and they're back pack. you can keep five at a time. >> and like a landing. is a lending library a of the subscrn services at $10 per month we launched in the month of june and this was the end of the first quarter we're beginning to get the results of the athletics and the metrics. we have seen that it is working. 600,000 works. the entry-level its three years old can you imagine any other brick and mortar? in only five months. a bill of the various communities particip
that a rocket is only seconds away. the israeli defense force is hitting back with technology that hamas could only dream of. this idf video shows a missile hitting the home of an hamas leader. the military says the secondary explosions are proof of explosives stored in the building. hamas is claiming its own trophy. the group's military wing says it has shot down a military f-16 and damaged two other israeli aircraft. israel denies losing any aircraft. egypt is trying to stop this war before it is too late. cairo's intelligence chief is spearheading talks to end the violence. but on the border, peace looks like an unlikely prospect. our senior international correspondent, ben wedeman joins us now between the border between israel and gaza. ben, ground war, are we about to witness that? >> reporter: i don't think immediately, don. i think there's still time needed to get the israeli military ready for a ground invasion. keep in mind that gaza is an area just twice the size of washington, d.c., with a population of 1.5 million people. any military force that goes in there has got to contend wit
the technology that they have and do police predictable policing and getting them the tools and the support from the rest of the city that they can do better predictive policing when it comes to crime patterns in the city and what is going on, but the most important part and you will hear this from the chief, from deanna and myself is the community organizing. that the strength of any program is investment in our people and that means organizing our communities, faith base communities and different organizations, the tenants right here in sunny dale, the residents here in this valley, all around mclaren park for example and get them organized and working with the community organizations that we fund, with our city department including first five and our human services department, our health department and others all engaged in the same direction with our faith base community to make sure we're working on all the programs and signal to people violence is not the answer. that we have a lot of great programs. that we want our kids to grow up and feel they have hope. whether or not they have par
to us to see what's going on. as far as technology we have ramped up our involvement with our technology in that we've created a base, a beta base, for people that have been arrested for robberies, people that have been arrested for guns. then we find out exactly where these robberies occurred then with that information the items that were taken a private data base called leads online and we see if that individual has been pawning property off prior so we're able to close those cases also and maybe solve prior violent crimes. to that end, i brought lieutenant plier to organize all the station sit teams and the sit teams are the station investigative teams where each team has, each station now has a stand-alone computer and a 55-inch screen where the crime alerts are streaming through. the officers are seeing what's going on in the city, who is wanted for what, whether they are known or unknown. so it's really incruised their awareness. then through that information sharing with the officers we're identifying individuals that have committed robberies and are unidentified and/or are inv
jury for the department of technology -- >> president torres: right. >> i worked on that as well as our i.t. director as well as our -- nancy hahn who runs insurance and controls and our vomp was to -- to the independent grand jury to the telecommunications department. >> president torres: which is under the jurisdiction of the puc. >> no it's not but we do use their services like citywide e-mail and citywide data. >> president torres: so you indicated the issues that we had with the department of technology. >> we did and we participated in the hearing that the board of supervisors had, i think it was a week and a half ago. >> president torres: thank you. any questions? >> any questions? okay. thank you very much. >> president torres: thank yo you. >> the next item is the quarterly budget report. >> it's a pleasure to give you some more good news today, and that good news is that water sales hav up. and the water sales being up has helped both our wastewater as well as our water enterprise. so in your packet today, i have three brief slides to walk through with you on that report. wate
, there is definitely wear and tear, there is definitely changes in technology. our campus has tried very hard to keep these phones in working order." the importance of keeping the blue lights working was evident last saturday morning, when two of them were activated at 12:35 am. devon thames, a reporter for the spartan daily, was listening to her police scanner when she heard ten university officers dispatched near the event center. "by the time i got here, the ambulance was showing up, and i heard over the radio that they guy was being taken to regional medical center." a 22-year old man was stabbed near the corner of third and san antonio streets he made it back to campus, leaving a trail of blood, and was picked up by paramedics between the event center and sweeney hall. although this phone at sweeny hall did it's job ... there's another point of concern .... that is u-p-d did not send an alert s-j-s-u notification to the student body. "the incident appears to have happened far enough away that there was not a concern that there was an immediate threat to university students here on campus." the a
strikes me as a step to get the behavioral change and the technological innovation we will need to adjust and adapt to what we have already done. a carbon tax also raises revenue in a way that could be used in different forms. it has an additional benefit associated with it. i am in favor of it. i do not think it is remotely plausible within the narrow political discussion we're having today. >> we start seeing gasoline prices coming down because the price of oil starts to fall because of all the activity producing in this country, maybe that will be an opportunity to increase the federal gasoline tax. with 50 cents a gallon federal tax. >> the only problem is from a climate perspective, transportation and gasoline is a small share of the problem. the problem is really in the energy sector. without a carbon tax, you're not directly getting at that. >> i think the carbon tax makes enormous sense to do with the environment impact of energy use. you can design one in a way that does not cause too much harm for american industries that compete with folks abroad. consumption tax, there are thi
.com. but proven technologies iallow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. then don't get nickle and dimed by high cost investments and annoying account fees. at e-trade, our free easy-to-use online tools and experienced retirement specialists can help you build a personalized plan. and with our no annual fee iras and a wide range of low cost investments, you can execute the plan you want at a low cost. so meet with us, or go to etrade.com for a great retirement plan with low cost investments. ♪ focompanies used to seeplan witus as demographics.nts. because they couldn't see what made people different. today, retailers from the us to japan are using analytics to find insights in soci
in technology like video production. it's interesting, you get to create your own work and it reflects what you feel about saying things so it gives perspective on issues. >> we work really hard to develop very in depth content, but if they don't have a venue, they do not have a way to show us, then this work is only staying here inside and nobody knows the brilliance and the amazing work that the students are doing. >> the term has changed over time from a very basic who has a computer and who doesn't have a computer to now who has access to the internet, especially high speed internet, as well as the skills and the knowledge to use those tools effectively. . >> the city is charged with coming up with digital inclusion. the department of telecommunications put together a 15 member san francisco tech connect task force. we want the digital inclusion program to make sure we address the needs of underserved vulnerable communities, not communities that are already very tech savvy. we are here to provide a, b and c to the seniors. a stands for access. b stands for basic skills and c stands for cont
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 105 (some duplicates have been removed)